The Assignment

Original Title:The Assignment
Published Date:25th Aug 2020
Publisher:Delacorte Press
Edition Language:English
Format:Hardcover
Number of Pages:312 Pages
Rating :
About Liza M. Wiemer
My new YA contemporary novel, The Assignment will be published August 25, 2020 by Delacorte Press. I am also the author Hello? and two non-fiction adult books, short stories, and newspaper and magazine articles. A pre-school to high school educator now conducting workshops and writing. I'm a Green Bay Packers fan and I love rooftops and crazy socks.Author website: http://www.LizaWiemer.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lizamwiemer/Unique "job" experiences: I spent a summer selling popcorn in a Koepsell's popcorn wagon while listening to awesome music on the Summerfest grounds in Milwaukee. I also know my way around a fender and a quarter panel and under the hood of a car. I spent a few years driving to accident scenes, scrapyards, hospitals, auto repair shops as a claims adjuster for an insurance company. Happy reading, Liza

The Assignment Overview

In the vein of the classic The Wave and inspired by a real-life incident, this riveting novel explores discrimination and antisemitism and reveals their dangerous impact.

SENIOR YEAR. When an assignment given by a favorite teacher instructs a group of students to argue for the Final Solution, a euphemism used to describe the Nazi plan for the genocide of the Jewish people, Logan March and Cade Crawford are horrified. Their teacher cannot seriously expect anyone to complete an assignment that fuels intolerance and discrimination. Logan and Cade decide they must take a stand.
As the school administration addressed the teens' refusal to participate in the appalling debate, the student body, their parents, and the larger community are forced to face the issue as well. The situation explodes, and acrimony and anger result. What does it take for tolerance, justice, and love to prevail?

The Assignment Reviews

  • You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight The Assignment is such a powerful novel that beautifully illustrates the importance of history, and the even bigger importance of not repeating the mistakes of the past. I thought that the author handled this issue in a way that was not only very sensitive, but very believable. And since it was based on a true story, which the author speaks about in her note, she absolutely does it justice. See, when the titular assignment is given, it's given by a very beloved, and usually socially aware teacher. As such, his words seem to hold more meaning to the class, who as a whole are hesitant to call him out on the straight up awfulness of the assignment. Logan and Cade are completely disgusted and aware of how messed up this whole thing is, but they're not really sure how to handle it. Again, the author does a fabulous job of making it feel so realistic and authentic to how actual students would likely react. The teacher and principal are not particularly willing to listen to the students' concerns, which is obviously infuriating to both the reader and Logan and Cade. So, they come up with their own plans! They seek outside help (which is really smart, tbh, and something I applauded), and they also were driven to look more deeply into their own histories. I don't want to get into it too much, because spoilers, but I loved that part so much. There were feels and tears, as both the characters and readers were able to explore past and present colliding. While there were maybe a few two many character points-of-view for me to keep straight, I wholly enjoyed this story for both its necessity, and the story itself. Frankly, we can use more hopeful stories where we show that a handful of people can make positive societal changes. Especially in our current landscape. Bottom Line: A beautifully written reminder of why we must stand up for what we know is right, stand up against the mistakes of the past, and that no matter the struggle ahead, it's always, always worth doing. 
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  • I had been looking forward to reading Liza Wiemer’s "The Assignment" as soon as I heard the description. Based on a true story, Wiemer’s novel follows two teens who refuse to do an antisemitic assignment given in history class—one in which they’re expected to argue FOR the Nazi Final Solution and the murder of millions of Jewish people. Wiemer deftly handles this tough topic, creating two main characters, Cade and Logan, who are both fun and funny, witty and endearing, and just regular teens with regular teen problems on top of the huge challenge at the center of the novel. You’ll sink into the story as if you’re eavesdropping on their conversations. Wiemer’s dialogue writing is just that good! Standing up for the right thing should be easy, but somehow it never is—and the finely crafted plot brings us unexpected challenges and a surprising, poignant twist. This is an important modern-day story about intolerance and racism that every teen and adult should read and DISCUSS. I am going to be thinking about this book for a long time and take the liberty to quote the question on the cover. “Would YOU speak up for what is right?”
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  • When I started this novel I expected it to be just like The Wave. It is so much more. The Assignment tells the story of Cade and Logan, who, when given an assignment to defend Nazi actions, refuse to participate in the class debate. The reaction sparks support and dissonance from their classmates, their teachers, the residents of their town, and ultimately the nation. Logan and Cade learn a great deal about themselves and others. But the most important lesson they learn is to speak up. Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for allowing me to be an early reader of this important novel.
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  • ***Thanks to NetGalley for providing me a complimentary copy of THE ASSIGNMENT by Liza Wiemer in exchange for my honest review.***When a beloved history teacher gives an assignment to argue in favor of the holocaust to get a deeper perspective of the genocide the Nazi perpetrated, seniors Cade and Jordan set out to stop THE ASSIGNMENT.Liza Wiemer wrote a Big Issue Book that doesn’t pretend to offer readers a choice on how to think about THE ASSIGNMENT. All of the characters against the debate are the Good Ones. All of the students in favor of the debate are anti Semitic. Mr Barclay has intentions of getting the teens to think outside the book, but hasn’t though through potential negative consequences of teens whose brains haven’t begun growing using the pro side for bullying. As a psychologist, I see value in examining (not debating) a despicable point of view as part of understanding human behavior to prevent history from repeating. To me, shutting down discussion is an opportunity lost. When we view things in absolute terms of black and white, we lose any possible ability to see humanity. Was every slave owner a terrible person? What of the man who treated his slaves well? He will always be wrong for having slaves, even if he’s not the same level of wrong as those who treated slaves poorly. Allowing for levels of wrong helps understand ancestors and history better with the basic premise slavery was wrong. Was every Nazi despicable? Did every Nazi want to follow Hitler? A discussion looking into possible thoughts of Nazis with the underlying given that everything about the Holocaust was wrong could have been a useful learning tool.THE ASSIGNMENT is filled with information about Nazi Germany, and Mr Barclay doesn’t miss an opportunity to speak out against the Holocaust. He probably should have handled the class knuckleheads better.Cade’s character when through the biggest transformation, his subplot was the most interesting. All of the characters were secondary to The Big Issue. With frequent point of view changes including students and faculty, grabbing on to anyone was difficult. I liked Mason, the bully coach’s son best.THE ASSIGNMENT is an important, but heavy-handed story that could have been more nuanced.
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  • I received this book from NetGalley in exchange of an honest review. Thank you so much, Random House Children's and Delacorte Press for giving me the chance to read this book."History is one of our best teachers. Unfortunately, this assignment will show you that society hasn't learned much at all." *During their senior year, Logan March and Cade Crawford are shocked and upset when their favourite teacher gives the class an assignment where they have to argue for the Final Solution. Aware that this kind of assignment could fuel rage and hate, they decide to take a stand against it, complaining to their teacher, their principal and then talking to an organization fighting for peace and justice, involving the press and do anything they could think of to stop the assignment and the debate. When the school's administration refuses to cancel them and Logan's and Cade's involvment in the protest is addressed, the whole community, friends, parents and teachers are forced to face the issue, unearthing antisemitism, bigotry, rage and hate. Will Logan and Cade be able to fight for respect, love and humanity or will the hate prevail in the community they thought safe?Cade and Logan are two best friends that decide to refuse and fight against the assignment, aware than this could, and will, validate some of their classmates' hate and antisemitism, above all some of the hockey's team. Logan and Cade are strong-willed, strong and determinate character, aware that they are fighting for the right thing, refusing to back down, even when they are targeted by online and in real life bullies. The assignment focuses on Logan's and Cade's POVs and the reader learns to know them, their friendship, stubborness, fierceness and their relationship with their classmates and relatives. The reader is able to know Cade's bond to his parents and grandparents, to his Nana, his loyalty to his family's inn, his sacrifices for it and his own family, as Logan's relationship with her father and Logan's and Cade's crush for one other. But, even though the romance is addressed and present it doesn't put aside their fight and their focus and the consequences their opposition has on the community.Even though Logan and Cade are the main characters, The assignment has multiple POVs, focusing on various classmates and their thoughts and involvement in the situation. Mason and his relationship with his girlfriend, his bullying and violent father, his teammates and their hate and anger; Heather and her determination, stubborness and desire to do the right thing, defying her father's wants; Daniel, bullied because he's gay and his stand with Logan and Cade; the principal, the teacher and so on. Through short or long chapters, the book shows the community's reaction to this assignment and Logan's and Cade's reaction to it.One of the thing I found absolutely interesting, after reading the author's note, is that this assignment was inspired by a real antisemitic assignment, that was defied by two teenagers, Archer Shurtliff and Jordan April (like Logan and Cade). Even though The assignment is a work of fiction, I was shocked and upset( but, let's be honest, not so surprised) when I learned that there are and were many assignments like this one, fortunately defied by other brave teenagers.In our current world, where concentration camps still exist, where hate, bigotry and anger are fuel for so many incidents around the world, I found this book realistic, riveting and unputdownable. Woven into the story, there are so many interesting historical facts I loved since I'm a history nerd, like Logan.The characters, from the main to the side ones, are interesting, complex and really relatable, I found myself involved in the story right away, my attention captured.The story, the historical facts, everything was heartbreaking, moving and beautifully and skillfully written.This book is a must read. It's important, eye-opening, powerful and heartbreaking. It's about standing up for the right thing, be brave, be loving and it's absolutely amazing."Make your home, your school, your community a place where humanKIND is welcomed"**quotes are from the earc and could change in the final product
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  • This review was originally posted on Andi's ABCs I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review. There are some books you just read and you know you are going to have a hard time writing about. Sometimes it is because you didn’t like the book. Sometimes it is because you loved the book so much you can’t find the words. And sometimes it is because you know your review won’t give it justice. Well I can tell you right now that the review for The Assigment is going to be a difficult review to write. Not because the book wasn’t good but because it is a really important book. It’s a book that my review won’t give it the justice it deserves, but I’m going to try anyway.The Assignment is Liza Wiemer second published novel. It follows two high school seniors, Logan and Cade, that are best friends and partners in crime. They always have each others back and things don’t change when their favorite teacher assigns a group of students to argue in favor of the Final Solution, most commonly known as the genocide of Jewish people by the Nazis. Logan and Cade think the assignment is wrong and immoral and a form of hatred and discrimination. When they bring it up to the administration they feel they are pacified and decide to take this as far as they have to so no one has to do anything like this again. When the community gets involved everyone must take a hard look at who they are and what they stand for and how to make sure Cade and Logan get the result they and the Jewish community deserve.The one thing you need to know is that The Assignment is a powerful book about what is right and wrong and how to use your voice for injustice. There is never a doubt in Cade and Logan’s mind that the assignment given to them is wrong and they are willing to fight until they are heard. Because it is a favorite teacher people refuse to take them seriously because they don’t want to lose someone they love but Cade and Logan are willing to take the wrath of the school district to make sure they are heard. That’s what I loved about this book. These two teenagers were more willing to stand up for people than the adults. That says a lot about a community and about how these two were raised.Again what I can leave you with is The Assignment is a powerful, must read. You will be sad and angry but you will feel empowered by the end. Liza Wiemer crafted a story that is a much read for teens and adults alike that asks some hard questions. Definitely pick this book up as soon as you can. You won’t be sorry.
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  • Liza Wiemer is a gifted writer. A fantastic resource for all educators, where everyday heroes teach us that we can and should, stand up to evil and keep on going with our heads held high. I can see every school handing out a copy of The Assignment as required reading for staff, students and their families, to facilitate relevant and timeless discussion about always doing what is right. I laughed, cried, and cheered along with Wiemer’s well thought out and very relatable characters. I couldn’t put the book down. The Assignment should become the new standard in facilitating empathy education for all young adults worldwide.
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  • I recently had the privilege of reading an ARC of Liza Wiemer’s upcoming new release, The Assignment. After having devoured her first YA novel, Hello?, I was anxiously waiting to read this new novel, which did not disappoint! A group of teens are presented with a very difficult situation when their much beloved and respected teacher gives them an assignment to pretend they’re Nazis and argue for the Final Solution. Our two lead characters, Logan and Cade, are horrified. The story begins as the two discuss, argue, question, debate just how and why their teacher could do such an incredulous thing. I loved the dialogue between these two best friends, moving each other forward with conviction to stop this assignment from happening. What they didn’t expect was to do this alone, and the varying reaction from friends, fellow students, family and community. The vast majority of their classmates' acceptance without question, is also part of the story and I thought this was very well done because this is an age where teens are still trying to figure out who they are, what they feel, find their voice, or simply just deciding to imitate their own parents for lack of desire or readiness to examine their own feelings.What a beautiful story Wiemer tells, and her writing is such a gift. I found myself pausing quite a bit while reading the book, to think about how I would have handled this as my teenage self, trying to deal with the confusion, the rage, and the disappointment and disbelief that adults in charge of our education would make a decision that was so wrong. It brought back many memories as I think we all are faced with decisions like this when learning and developing our own sense of self. I think I would have taken the road of not speaking up, as that was often the easiest choice and gave me less of a chance of standing out. What Logan and Cade did was so commendable, but difficult. They were let down and so disappointed by the reactions of so many people, but their passion and determination to be heard, along with their dedication to each other, was so uplifting and a joy to be part of.Teaching racism, antisemitism, and intolerance, in general, are difficult subjects, especially during these formative years. This book is such a great learning tool for teachers and parents to share with their kids as it encourages an inward search, discovering your own voice and learning that hate has no place in our world and our differences should be tolerated not judged. I applaud Wiemer’s storytelling, her message and am so grateful to have been able to read it early. Wiemer's books always change me in such positive, gentle ways. I look forward to her next ones!
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  • Morality, passion, and sincerity make The Assignment a must-read. Liza Wiemer weaves the historical content of the Wannsee Conference and the Final Solution into the novel, adding depth, clarity, and perspective to Cade and Logan's (primary characters) concerns. Complex characters (both primary and secondary) learn that speaking up is more important than just surviving―a powerful, relevant, and necessary message for all readers.Liza Wiemer understands her audience and knows how to handle sensitive topics. My students and I enjoy HELLO?, and I can't wait to teach The Assignment next year.
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  • Since I first heard about the events that inspired Wiemer to write this book I've been anxious to read her powerful and important contemporary novel. I finally got my hands on an advance copy. It far exceeded my high expectations. The publisher's synopsis reveals why the story is such a relevant one, suited to teens and adult readers, one that begs for book clubs, literature discussions, and personal reflections. The steadily rising plot is an undeniable strength, but I was equally impressed by the finely-honed character development, the compelling shifts in point of view and voice, including secondary characters and text-messaging chapters, all of which captured real-world lives perfectly. The writing presents a remarkable balance among many potent relationships, but none risk dominating the spotlight, and each adds energy to drive the stakes higher. The central (and realistically heroic) characters are longtime friends, seniors, with a simmering undercurrent of romance. They each come from stressed but supportive families, and both have made impressive strides toward clearcut goals, all of which will feel familiar to many teen readers. The central conflict arises when Logan (she's a girl, thank you very much!) is appalled by a research-simulation-role play assignment requiring students to enact Hitler's Wannsee Conference to debate THE FINAL SOLUTION. Logan's favorite teacher reassures the class that this is only an intellectual exercise, that he is in no way encouraging support of the events or arguments. Nevertheless, she finds it morally reprehensible and indefensible. Cade agrees. I knew this central issue before I cracked the cover, but once I began reading, I couldn't stop. That moral dilemma and the relentless efforts of two loyal allies to resolve it from within "the system" left me feeling as frustrated yet committed as they were. A range of characters and circumstances that unfold throughout ensuing struggles play out like an award-winning movie. (I hope it will be snapped up for such a project soon!) The short chapters, alternating and interspersed voices, complicating circumstances, family concerns, emotional tensions, and escalating efforts drove me forward to the complex but realistic and satisfying resolution. None of the multi-generational individuals who peopled this narrative fell into stereotypical roles. From within this story many current and worrying issues of nationalism, racism, and personal identity arose credibly- including political complications, social media frenzy, bullying, and hateful actions from those who were uninformed or misinformed. A startling shared secret near the end (PLEASE do not spoil this for other readers) is entirely believable and rooted in the personal accounts of many Americans.I've preordered several copies as gifts, one for me to keep, one to loan. I encourage everyone to read, share, and discuss this when YOU can get your hands on it. This is exactly the kind of story that should be discussed and explored in the midst of current antisemitism and racism.Coming soon to a bookstore or website soon. Don't wait for the movie, although I hope that will follow soon after.
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  • Wow! What an incredible novel. It's a pre-order, must read, must have in your classroom library & get in the hands of kids (and adults!) book.
  • As a child of a Holocaust survivor, I have lived with the history in this book my entire life. Wondering if I would have been strong, lucky and smart enough to survive has always been my burden. Today's students and the next generations will have a different dilemma. The problems inherent in an understanding of the ramifications of prejudice, racism, and stereotyping are not easy. People are still being bullied, and we need to empower students to speak up and be an upstander. They cannot remain silent!This book, placed squarely in today's world, will challenge both adults and youth, teachers and students, and is a 'must read' for our times. This book models the courage that is needed to deal with a society that does not always support them.
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  • This is a fabulously written book about how difficult it is to do the right thing, especially when the right thing is extremely unpopular. It’s a damning of the people who say “there’s a right way to protest” and then say “no, not like that” when someone does so in the “appropriate” way. It’s an illustration of the way so many acts of hate and attitudes of intolerance are ALREADY normalized in 2020 in the US. Integrity and righteousness are two lofty ideas to communicate to teenagers, especially when the stakes are high, but this book communicates them well and reasonably. Accurate and fair, often presenting various attitudes as they are, the reader is asked to see what right and wrong is for themselves, especially in the various chapters that highlight comment sections and social media. Identity is also a huge theme, one that I can relate personally to; my grandmother’s family converted from Judaism because they were harassed and alienated by their neighbors in Connecticut in the early 20th century. I didn’t realize how recently in my family’s history that was; how many other students will have similar experiences? This theme was treated with respect and great attention and affection throughout the book. I appreciate that the teacher’s own struggle with his actions is treated with dignity. I know that it is difficult to be an educator and maintain a balance between what might be engaging and what is responsible, and hope this serves as a wake-up call for students and teachers. The characters all had their own definite personalities; Logan and Cade especially were a joy to watch together. This is an excellent book on an especially relevant topic, and I look forward to seeing its release in print.
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  • Let me tell you what I didn’t expect about this book:I didn’t expect that it would be difficult to put down. I would have finished it sooner, but life gets in the way of plans.I didn’t expect to fall in love with Cade and Logan or relate to them on so many different levels or to wonder if I would have been able to do what they did as a teen. I didn’t expect to laugh and smile, especially since this books deals with such a tough topic.I didn’t expect to love the secondary characters and their perspectives, but I did. They add so much to the story. Heather, Mason and Daniel were all awesome in their own ways.I didn’t expect I’d feel so many different emotions about the teacher, Mr. Bartley. Liza Wiemer did an amazing job with this.Liza has an incredible knack of bringing the memory of a departed loved one into the story and showing how that person may not physically be with us, yet can still be a significant part of our lives. As someone who has lost both her parents, reading about Cade's relationship with his grandpa touched me deeply. I loved this book so much. Parents should read and discuss it with their teens. Teens should read it and hand it to their parents to read. This should be in every school. It’s powerful, important, thought-provoking, and unforgettable. Highly, highly recommend.
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  • Official blurb: "The Assignment shows the importance of asking questions, speaking truth even when it’s uncomfortable, and demanding change regardless of your age. A beautiful story, as smart and timely as it is page-turning, this book should be essential reading for both teens and adults.”Unofficial blurb: READ THIS BOOK.
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  • "Can you be proud of your heritage, your faith, your identity, yet also have a strong need to protect or hide yourself from the 'outside' world?" This is a question Liza Wiemer asks in her author's note, which I read before beginning the book. Before even starting THE ASSIGNMENT, Wiemer's words had already struck a very sensitive chord because that duality has been something I've struggled with since I was a kid (even having grown up in a predominantly Jewish community) and continue to struggle with to this day. The educator in me wants to see Liza Wiemer's THE ASSIGNMENT taught in classrooms alongside books like Elie Wiesel's NIGHT. As a librarian, I want to see it on the shelf of every high school and public library. As an author myself who wants to be part of bringing more Jewish characters to the forefront of popular literature, I think books like THE ASSIGNMENT are an important place to start, by putting them into the hands of young readers who need to see themselves represented on the pages of a book, but more importantly, for the non-Jewish reader to to gain the empathy needed to help stamp out the antisemitism and hate that is still, sadly, prevalent today. As a teen, there is nothing harder than to stand against the majority for the simple sake of doing what's right. Through Cade and Logan's actions, Wiemer shows the danger of doing so but also, ultimately, the hope and change that can come from such bravery. We need more Cades and Logans in literature and more Jordans and Archers (the real-life students upon which Cade and Logan are based) in our lives. Hopefully Wiemer's THE ASSIGNMENT is a step in that direction.
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  • Wow. Wiemer absolutely nailed it. I finished the book and had chills. As someone who also experienced an anti-Semitic incident at my university, I could see myself as Logan and Cade in every scenario. The tweets chapter, so powerful and realistic. It’s so incredible how Wiemer used modern events of anti-Semitism such as Charlottesville and Pittsburgh, which make the story all the more real and chilling. The backlash, the authority not backing down, making you doubt yourself and showing just how hard it is to stand up for what is right. The anxiety that comes with all of the repercussions. It really truly makes you ask yourself, would YOU?. And the answer is yes and should be yes, yet the right thing is not the easiest. This is an amazing book that everyone needs to read. It brought me to actual tears. I am in awe of this story and the lessons it teaches. EVERY piece of the story is so real. The administration defending the assignment, deeming it thought-provoking. Such a powerful ending to such a beautiful message. Life takes us by surprise and who knows where we will be in the future but as long as we do the right thing we’ll be in a good place with ourselves and won’t have to worry. I absolutely loved it and I finished the novel feeling empowered as a young woman to use my voice for change.
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  • The Holocaust happened decades ago and has no influence or impact on today. THE ASSIGNMENT shows how incredibly false that statement is. This riveting, thought-provoking, suspenseful and unforgettable book shows what happens when the lines of morality and decency are not considered and what it takes for teens with a conscience to take a stand. It reminds me of the times when I’ve been challenged to do the right thing and its my hope that this example will help young adults today to not turn their backs, but instead to make the difficult choice to do what’s honorable.
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  • I could not put this book down! In addition to being written beautifully, the author, Liza Wiemer, takes the readers on a courageous moral journey. Two high school students stand up to their school's beloved teacher who gives them an assignment that makes these seniors feel uncomfortable. They are supposed to pretend they are Nazis at the 1942 Wannsee Conference and give reasons why and how Jews should be murdered. As I read the book, I found myself wanting to fight alongside these two students because this isn't about a lone school assignment, this is about our world and the fragile and fine line our societies walk keeping hatred and violence in check against the "other". Nuanced and thought-provoking, I was swept into this story. I kept thinking: Would I have had the courage to stand up for what I believed is right and jeopardize my final GPA that might affect my future? This book goes beyond how the media is reporting hate crimes and prejudice today. We see the situation from many angles, and I admire that in Liza Wiemer's writing. It's important. It's relevant. It's emotional. It's meaningful. This outstanding realistic book will stay with me forever. It's a moral compass for today's young and adult readers alike. It's a must read for all!
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  • Simply fantastic. I hope this book is read in schools across the country.
  • I was privileged to read an ARC of The Assignment. It is a captivating YA novel that will cause you to reflect on your values and your courage if put in a position to follow the crowd or stand firm for what is right and just. In America and around the world, this book should be part of every middle school and high school curriculum. Chilling, surprising, thought-provoking, disturbing, inspiring, hopeful, and deeply relevant. There is much to unpack here; do so with your kids. Don't miss it when it launches in 2020. 
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  • I am so excited to read this book. Liza Wiemer is an outstanding writer. Her books, while targeted to young adults, are so compelling and important and speak to people of all ages. I know that this book, like her other books, will be an important one for readers to absorb, talk about and learn from.
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  • THE ASSIGNMENT is a powerful, courageous, timely story of two teens, Cade and Logan, who, listening to their inner voices, stand up for what they know to be right despite immense pressure from their teachers, community, and country to act otherwise. Though THE ASSIGNMENT thoughtfully and masterfully handles social justice issues with a sensitive yet honest touch, it also uniquely braids together the power of friendship, love, and family, composing a story that is part mystery, part love story, part full-on resistance! The alternating voices of Cade and Logan were also engaging, grounding this wholly satisfying and inspiring read. THE ASSIGNMENT took my breath away. Loved it!
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  • This is based on a true story, although the assignment is the only thing that isn't changed. We all think we'd be the people to stand up to injustice, but probably most of us are like the other students in the classroom. It's hard to stand up to people, and so we're very lucky that there are people like Logan and Cade in the world.I love everything about this story. The multiple perspectives give us the chance to experience it through other people's perspectives. We mostly see Cade and Logan, but the chapters from Mason and Cade's mom and Mr. Bartley show a more nuanced version than we would've seen if we had only read it from their point of view. I also love the subplot about the inn. It's impossible to understand Cade's actions throughout the novel without also understanding that he's someone who is so loyal and committed to a sense of what is right and decent. There has to be a better way to say this, but he's someone who sees everything through. He's an honorable person in a time where that's maybe not very important anymore.It's so inspiring and I love so much of what happened. Yes, there are a lot of awful things in the world, but there is also so much good. This book showcases both. It's completely impossible to not feel optimistic and inspired after reading it. It's available on August 25, and you absolutely need to read it as soon as you can. Highly recommended.
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